12

This is an indication on Sitecore 9 that your Web.config has been overwritten. Check the deployed Web.config, replace it with the stock 9.0 version if needed, and/or ensure your Visual Studio solution is configured to deploy the proper Web.config. It could be that one was added to a web app project after installing a nuget package. If you're using TDS, try ...


11

It's not required to be included or even included and then excluded from publish, it will not cause any issues with Intellisense or any other function of Visual Studio. The only reason for including it would be if you need to include some custom code on startup, even then it would be preferable to add a processor to into the initialize pipeline and run your ...


10

You need to change 2 things to get the gulp script to use v15.0 tools for MSBuild. First, in the gulp.js file, you need to change everywhere you see this toolsVersion: 14.0 to toolsVersion: 15.0. There are multiple places in the file to change it. Also, you need to make sure that the gulp-msbuild package is updated to the latest version to support build ...


9

It sounds like you have a matching item in /sitecore/System/Dictionary/. I did a quick test by adding a Dictionary item that matches the name of a field and the Content Editor picks it up.


9

With MVC 5, you should have the option to add an MVC 5 View Page, like so, Using this option gives you a simple popup to type in a name, then it generates a cshtml file with no scaffolding. @{ Layout = null; } <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width" /> <title></title> ...


6

A Sitecore solution application needs to inherit from Sitecore.Web.Application. <%@Application Language='C#' Inherits="Sitecore.Web.Application" %> Inside the application code; Sitecore manages session events (for xDB and so on). I guess, theoretically, you could refactor this into something else or a different approach. I'm not sure what ...


6

You need to set your Sitecore Rocks connection up using the Hard Rock Service: This will then give access to additional features and options, including the "Design Template" option: By comparison, using the Good Old Web Service, the options are as follows: The above is using Sitecore Rocks v2.1.69 and Visual Studio 2015. You mention you have set it up in ...


6

Although this is off-topic, this is a common issue in Sitecore for those who are experimenting with Helix/Habitat. Anyway, you can also achieve this on the VS UI which essentially results to the project file snippet Anton has shown above. Just choose Properties on the file you want to not process and change the Build Action to None.


5

You could also add a property group called ExcludeFilesFromDeployment to your profile.pubxml publishing profile. I have mine setup like this: <Project ToolsVersion="4.0" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003"> <PropertyGroup> <WebPublishMethod>FileSystem</WebPublishMethod> <LastUsedBuildConfiguration&...


5

You are getting these errors because the default templates that are installed contain some errors. Sitecore References Fix: In your folder where you installed the templates, find all the files called $modulenamespace$.csproj. In those files you will find these lines: <Reference Include="Sitecore.Kernel, Version=10.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, ...


5

You always want to put your visual studio solution outside of the website and deploy into it. Upgradability Unless you are going to add 10,000 files to your gitignore file, you are going to have the base Sitecore files in your solution. When you upgrade your website, you are certainly going to miss some files. Then you will overwrite your upgraded ...


5

TIL that Visual Studio 2017 introduced a Solution Explorer toolbar to switch between the classic "Solution" view and to a "Source Files" view which shows the files and folder structure which is on disk. From the Solution Explorer toolbar, click the Switch Views toolbar icon and select Folder View: You can now see the repository as it is on disk. Expand the ...


4

You cannot just assign image field value as a background image. You have to first get the src of the image like: @{ ImageField imageField = item.Fields["KfcStartContent_Img3"]; string url = Sitecore.Resources.Media.MediaManager.GetMediaUrl(imageField.MediaItem); } and then use it like: <div class="c-tile-red " style="background-image:url(@...


3

The answer to this would depend on what you are using for Source Control. I will try to answer assuming Git is your source control. Short Answer: Not easily... The short answer is, with regular Visual Studio and Git as the source, there is no easy way to do this. Sure, you could add VS projects to include the .yml files and do it that way, but that will ...


3

Yes, you can create the Visual Studio project inside the webroot of a Sitecore install. But It is not a recommended practice. Things to consider for Visual Studio project inside the webroot- Changes to the Visual Studio project are immediately available on the website. But every config update and build will recycle the app pool even we required that ...


3

If you use the default Web Applications with MVC project template, I'm not sure whether you can turn off this behaviour. However, you could potentially use Sitecore Rocks to create the files for you instead.


3

I have resolved the issue with @techphoria441 answer. Ensure that all your projects web.config Build Action is set to None.


2

Question 1 Answer: Under your VS web project, create identical structure as you need for all files under your_sitecore_instance_path/Sitecore/ folder that you would like to deploy: You just need to specify "Content" as their build action in Properties. Create WDP package to webdeploy it or you can use TDS (see below). Use TDS or Unicorn; If you use TDS ->...


2

As suggested by @jammykam, I removed the Global.asax. It stopped the warnings being popped up in my Visual Studio. I don't know why the Sitecore online training teaches you to add this file to the Visual Studio project, but you shouldn't do it as it is NOT recommended adding custom code to Global.asax. If you need anything that you think should go no Global....


2

Try this one: <ItemGroup> <None Update="file name" CopyToPublishDirectory="Never" /> </ItemGroup> It will change build action from content to none and will exclude file from publishing.


2

You can add your own replacement configuration into a .user file. <ItemGroup Condition=" '$(Configuration)' == 'Debug' "> <Replacement Include="[source folder]"> <TargetPath>[target folder]</TargetPath> <IsFolder>True</IsFolder> </Replacement> </ItemGroup>


2

Ideally It should not be a part of your VS Publish, it should be left as it is in server. As you have connectionstring.config related to environments not code. But if you have any custom database used in solution and varies according to environment then you may want to manage it form VS source control then you need to use transform tool like SlowCheetah ...


2

I think you have a misunderstanding of how TDS and Source Control work. First, TDS does not have any integration or dependency on a Source Control system. You can use TDS with Git, SVN, TFVC, whatever you want to use. All TDS is doing is taking the items from the Sitecore database and persisting them to files on the disk. In Visual Studio, it creates a ...


2

To find the specific errors as per your question you can try the below steps: Select the output in Visual studio to get the details and see what happens when sync. Use the Test button for TDS specific project to validate the values you entered are correct. Check for the logs in the Sitecore to see if you have any errors. Last but not least make sure you ...


2

I would like you to add connection string in VS, there are a few advantages: You can manage connection string of multiple environments like UAT, Prod, Debug, Release If you want to add some custom connection string then you can also add in that and it will also get published You can transform connection string using SlowCheetah After the SlowCheetah ...


2

Check that you are using a OData Connected Service version that is compatible with OData Client version 6.19.0. The OData Connected Service tool is (automatically in VS) upgraded to v0.7.1 and this version no longer supports the correct OData Client version. From v0.5 onwards it is only compatible with Microsoft.OData.Client to version 7.6.3. See here for ...


1

You need to follow Sitecore documentation that you mentioned in your question at the beginning precisely. Therefore you have to use VS2015 when you want to develop / deploy Sitecore Commerce 8.2.1 solution. You also need to download and install precisely .NET Core 1.0.3 SDK Preview 2 build 3156 and .NET Core 1.0.1 Visual Studio 2015 Tooling Preview 2. See ...


1

The answer was to update Visual Studio from 15.0 to 15.9. Once I did that then the installation from Nuget worked. Who would have guessed. :)


1

I fixed this by updating to the latest version of Rocks, then restarting VS. To update Rocks: - Right-click the connection name under 'Connections' in Sitecore Explorer from the menu choose "Connections" / "Update Server Components" Hit "Update All". At time of writing latest version was 2.1.88.0


1

This can happen if the same template is included as a base template multiple times on another template. Usually this happens if you have the same template included as a base template in multiple templates that are also used as base templates to compose your template. That's hard to digest; an example would be more helpful, I think: Template: Vehicle Field:...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible