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I need to make a history of a Sitecore website. It should just be able to tell the editors when (from/to date) and what (content) have been on the website. I’m using Sitecore 8.2 update 2, and are using a combination of fields on the pages itself, rendering-parameters and shared data items.

I’m first idea is to append a pipeline right after the PublishItem.PerformAction, and if it is a page, then save it's full HTML. This will save the page whenever the rendering-parameters or the fields on the page are changed. But will not save the page if the shared data is changed. So when a shared data is published, then I will have to check all the pages, in order to see, if any of them are using the shared data being published.

The disadvantages of this approach, is that a lot have to be saved to the database, due to I’m saving all the HTML on the page.

My question is - are there an easier/better way of doing this?

  • Edit: This approach is not working due to the fact, that some renderings on pages are using the children or parent items of the data source. So a cross-reference between shared data and pages is not going to give me which pages are inflected by the data source change. Anyone having a good idea? – PirateXses Feb 23 '17 at 10:36
  • Do you need to just record when items are changed and by who? github.com/tmamedbekov/sitecore.audit.logging – Chris Auer Feb 23 '17 at 13:54
  • Thank you for your replay. But no, it is a bit more complicated then that. I need a full history of all webpages. Even if items are deleted or rendering implementations are changed, i should still be able to go back in time and have the website looked like in a previous point in time. Therefore it is not enough to just save all item changes. – PirateXses Feb 24 '17 at 20:39
  • Should you then be able to revert back to a previous item or do you only require a record? – Hishaam Namooya Feb 24 '17 at 23:03
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At SYM2016 I saw a demo of the marketplace module that XCentium built called Vault. It sounds exactly like what you are looking for. Their site says it even has the ability to show you what it looked like using a History-Database.

https://marketplace.sitecore.net/en/Modules/V/Vault_for_Sitecore.aspx

http://www.xcentium.com/digital-solutions/sitecore/vault

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  • Nifty tool! I note there's no pricing information on their site, which tells me it's expensive. – Sergeant Sitecore Oct 10 '17 at 16:46
  • I have no idea about costs.In the end, you would have to compare the costs of the estimated and real cost/effort that it would cost to build what you are needing versus the cost of their offering. – David Walker Oct 10 '17 at 16:52
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If you have a legal obligation to produce the physical appearance of any URL on your site at any point in the past, do not rely on Sitecore, or any dynamically-assembled archive. It may not be admissible. You want a hard-copy of each URL as it appeared on that day. You should look at some professional archive solutions designed to address this need specifically.

Over the past five years, I've seen this growing market's offerings mature as governments are increasingly regulating the legality and accessibility of web content.

As an example, this company offers full legal compliance solutions for digital assets: http://www.smarsh.com/

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  • Good call Sergeant. You definitely want to make sure you meet any regulation requirements. I don't think it sounded like that was the case with this particular question. However, if it is a "regulation requirement" then of course, make sure you legal team is the one who gives final decision to whatever solution you deliver. – David Walker Oct 24 '17 at 13:28

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